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Sunday, 12 February 2012

Factors influencing the H-index

  • There are differences in typical values of the H-index in different fields, determined in part by the average number of references in a paper in the field, the average number of papers produced by each scientist in the field, and the size (number of scientists) of the field. Subfields with typically large collaborations will exhibit larger values of the H-index.
  • Since values of H-index increase over time, it is apparent that a scientist's H-index depends on the person's scientific age, and the H-index always puts newcomers at a disadvantage and older, well-established scientists at an advantage.
  • H-index does not differentiate citations according to the citing journal and does not take into account the context of citations.
  • The H-index is strongly affected by the Total number of papers, which may underestimate scientists with short careers and scientists who have published only a few although significant papers.
  • H-index is insensitive to one or several outstandingly highly cited papers.
  • H-index is relatively insensitive to self-citations, because all self-citations to papers with less than H citations are irrelevant, as are the self-citations to papers with many more than H citations.
  • The H-index is strongly affected by the Total number of papers, which may underestimate scientists with short careers and scientists who have published only a few although significant papers.

1.3.1.7.13 Citation metrics - ToR - Toolbox of Research - Confluence

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